Lesson 16 – Camping – Modal Verbs II

LEVEL A2: CAMPING

 


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VOCABULARY

 

 

  • Are you ready?
  • a camp trip
  • I think so.
  • To check
  • We should check...
  • We have everything
  • We must not forget...
  • The essentials
  • We are going to be...
  • In the middle of nowhere
  • I have to buy...
  • Batteries
  • a torch
  • an airbed
  • To make sure
  • Definitely
  • I don't want to...
  • On the cold ground
  • Terribly uncomfortable
  • I should ring Polly.
  • To confirm
  • the house sitting
  • Arrangements
  • Plenty of food
  • She gave me a list.
  • To leave her some extra money
  • Good thinking!
  • Stove
  • I think we have enough.
  • Very true!
  • I'll buy a couple more.
  • I think that should be enough.
  • We shouldn't have any problems.
  • Why would you say such things?
  • If it rains...
  • I'm blaming you!

 

LESSON 16 DIALOGUE

 

- Camping -

 

 

Learn English - Lesson 16 - Camping

David: Okay! Are you ready for the camp trip?

Karen: I think so! We should check that we have everything.

David: Yes, we must not forget the essentials. We are going to be in the middle of nowhere.

Karen: I have to buy some batteries for the torch and we ought to check the airbed to make sure that there is no air escaping.

David: Definitely. I don't want to wake up on the cold ground. It will be terribly uncomfortable!

Karen: I should ring Polly and confirm the house sitting arrangements. You have to go shopping so that she has plenty of food.

David: She gave me a list. I'll buy the items but I ought to leave her some extra money in case she runs out of anything.

Karen: Good thinking! Also you must pick up some more gas canisters for the stove. I think we have enough but as they say, "better to have and not need than need and not have".

David: Very true. I'll buy a couple more packs. I think that should be enough.

Karen: We shouldn't have any problems now. Unless of course it rains...

David: Why would you say such things? If it rains, I'm blaming you!

 

COMPREHENSION QUIZZES (3 TO COMPLETE)

 

Interactive Video Comprehension Quiz 1

 

Summary Statements Comprehension Quiz 2

 

Drag and Drop Quiz 3: 

 

GRAMMAR PRACTICE - MODAL VERBS II:  SHOULD AND MUST

 

 

Must


If you remember session 15, we use "must" when we speak of obligation and necessity, when an obligation has to be fulfilled. The structure of the phrase is usually the following:

I MUST Rest of the sentence
You
He
She
It
We
You
They

 

Examples:

I must work
You must work
He must work
She must work
It must work
We must work
You must work
They must work

 

When we talk about obligation in the past, we do not use must. Instead, we used to to talk about an obligation that has been fulfilled:

I HAD TO Rest of the sentence
You
He
She
It
We
You
They

 

Examples:

had to study.

David had to work.

 

When we use must in a negative way, it becomes mustn't. This form is used for emphasis. The usual way is the contraction must not.

I MUSTN'T Rest of the sentence
You
He
She
It
We
You
They

 

Example:

You are ill. You mustn't go out.

 

There is also a form that defines a lack of obligation using the verb to need. Their common form, in negative, is do not need to.

I/ You DON'T NEED TO Rest of the sentence
He/She/It DOESN'T NEED TO
We/You/They DON'T NEED TO

 

Examples:

You don't need to speak English in Spain.

 

I don't need to come
You don't need to come
He doesn't need to come
She doesn't need to come
It doesn't need to come
We don't need to come
You don't need to come
They don't need to come

 

Should


Suggestions and tips are formed using should. The structure of the phrase is generally as follows:

I SHOULD Rest of the sentence
You
He
She
It
We
You
They

 

Examples:

I should study
You should study
He should study
She should study
It should study
We should study
You should study
They should study

 

When using the negative form, we use shouldn't. A contraction of should not.

I SHOULDN'T Rest of the sentence
You
He
She
It
We
You
They

 

Example:

You shouldn't  smoke.

 

Often, the expression I think, is placed at the beginning of a phrase that contains should. Example:

I think you shouldn't smoke.

 

You can also use ought to instead of should and keep the same meaning. Example:

You ought to stay in bed.

 

PRONUNCIATION PRACTICE 

 

 

 

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