Lesson 17 – Thank You – Obligations

LEVEL A2: THANK YOU

 


THERE IS AN OPTION FOR YOU TO TRANSLATE ALL THE TEXT

IN YOUR LANGUAGE (Top right > Select language > Click on the flags).


 

VOCABULARY

 

 

  • You don't have to thank me.
  • I enjoyed it.
  • Was everything okay?
  • Did you have to buy...?
  • Anything extra?
  • Everything was fine.
  • I had to buy…
  • To have to buy
  • Fresh milk
  • The money that you left...
  • Everything was perfect.
  • I have to book tickets.
  • The theatre
  • Would you like to come along?
  • Our treat
  • Helping us
  • What play is it?
  • You don't have to…
  • It doesn't interest you
  • It would be great.
  • I'd like to come.
  • That's settled.
  • At one point...
  • The roads were closed.
  • The long way round
  • To take a very long detour
  • We had to camp.
  • In a field
  • It was fun.

 

LESSON 17 DIALOGUE

 

- Thank You -

 

 

Learn English - Lesson 17 - Thank You

Karen: Hi Polly! Thank you for house sitting for David and I!

Polly: That’s fine. You don't have to thank me. I enjoyed it!

Karen: Was everything okay? Did you have to buy anything extra?

Polly: Everything was fine. I had to buy some fresh milk and bread from the money that you left. Other than that, everything was perfect.

Karen: I have to book tickets for the theatre this weekend. Would you like to come along? It’s our treat for helping us!

Polly: What play is it?

Karen: It’s Shakespeare’s Hamlet. You don’t have to come if it doesn't interest you. But it would be great if you could come along!

Polly: I love Shakespeare! I’d like to come to the theatre very much!

Karen: Then that's settled.

Polly: So, how was the camp trip?

Karen: It was great! Though at one point one of the roads was closed so we had to take the long way round to get to the camp site.

Polly: Oh no, did you have to take a very long detour?

Karen: We did... We had to camp in a field for one night. It was fun and nice not to share a site with other campers.

Polly: Aw, I’m happy that you both had a good time!

 

COMPREHENSION QUIZZES (3 TO COMPLETE)

 

Interactive Video Comprehension Quiz 1

 

Summary Statements Comprehension Quiz 2

 

Drag and Drop Quiz 3: 

 

GRAMMAR PRACTICE: OBLIGATIONS

 

 

Expressing obligation


In the last session we analysed in detail the forms of manners. In specific, must, should and ought to. Each shape denotes a particular tone and requires information. In this session we will learn more in other ways to express obligation.

 

Have to...

The first form uses the expression have to:

I/You have to Rest of the sentence
He/She/It has to
We/You/They have to

 

Example:

I have to go to the doctor

I have to go
You have to go
He has to go
She has to go
It has to go
We have to go
You have to go
They have to go

 

Negative form

I/You Don´t have to Rest of the sentence
He/She/It Doesn´t have to
We/You/They Don´t have to

 

Example:

don´t have to go to the doctor.

 

I don´t have to go
You don´t have to go
He doesn´t have to go
She doesn´t have to go
It doesn´t have to go
We don´t have to go
You don´t have to go
They don´t have to go

 

Interrogative form

 

Do I/You Have to + ?
Does He/She/It
Do We/You/They

 

Example:

Do you have to go to the doctor?

 

Do I have to go?
Do you have to go?
Does he have to go?
Does she have to go?
Does it have to go?
Do we have to go?
Do you have to go?
Do they have to go?

 

 

Simple Past of Have to


The simple past form is the same as must:

I Had to Rest of the sentence
You
He
She
It
We
You
They

 

Example:

I had to go to the doctor.

 

Interrogative form

In the past, the interrogative form changes:

Did I Have to + ?
You
He
She
It
We
You
They

 

Example:

Did you have to go to the doctor?

 

Negative form

I Didn´t have to Rest of the sentence
You
He
She
It
We
You
They

 

Example:

I didn´t have to go to the doctor.

 

Must vs. Have to


The difference between the two is very subtle. So subtle in fact that even some English speakers have difficulties distinguishing them.

Have to expresses an obligation in which it does not take into account the speaker's opinion:

 

Example:

They have to receive a generous amount of compensation after the accident.

 

Must expresses an obligation that takes into account the speaker's opinion:

 

Example:

You look tired. You must sleep.

 

Must expresses an obligation that takes into account the speaker's opinion:

 

Example:

You must answer all the questions.

 

Introduction to conditional


A conditional can be formed with the participle Would. We will look at this form in later sessions but meanwhile we will take a brief look at the structure:

 Would you like…?

We use this interrogative to make offers:

 

Example:

Would you like a cup of tea?

Would you like to…?

This interrogative form is used to make invitations:

 

Example:

Would you like to see a film?

 

I'd like…/I'd like to…

This form is used to request something in a courteous way:

 

Examples:

I'd like a can of coke, please.

I'd like to buy a ticket.

 

 

PRONUNCIATION PRACTICE

 

 

 

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