Lesson 23 – The Amusement Park – Interrogative forms

LEVEL A2 THE AMUSEMENT PARK

 


THERE IS AN OPTION FOR YOU TO TRANSLATE ALL THE TEXT

IN YOUR LANGUAGE (Top right > Select language > Click on the flags).


 

 

VOCABULARY

 

 

  • What time are we…?
  • A one hour drive
  • Amusement park
  • We have to pick up...
  • Who are we picking up?
  • A guy who works with...
  • I’ve not met him
  • He's good fun
  • I am looking forward to...
  • Rollercoaster ride
  • I haven’t been…
  • What’s your favourite...?
  • I’m not fond of…
  • Ghost trains
  • Are you scared?
  • I’m not scared
  • They are too slow
  • The effects are awful
  • To spend my time
  • Waiting in a queue
  • I once went...
  • Horror house
  • Fun house
  • To walk around
  • People dressed up
  • Characters
  • What do they do?
  • To jump out
  • To chase
  • You will be walking
  • Dark corridor
  • Eerie
  • To touch your head
  • To brush past your legs
  • That does sound scary
  • I hope that they have...

 

LESSON 23 DIALOGUE

 

- The amusement park -

 

 

 

Lesson 23 - The Amusement Park

Polly: What time are we meeting David and Karen tomorrow?

Jeff: We're meeting at 9am. It is a one hour drive to the amusement park and we have to pick up one more person.

Polly: Who are we picking up?

Jeff: A guy who works with David. His name is James. I've not met him but David says that he's good fun.

Polly: I am looking forward to going on some roller coaster rides. I haven't been on one for years. What’s your favourite ride?

Jeff: I quite like the waltzers and the nemesis. Any rides that throw you around really. I'm not fond of ghost trains though.

Polly: Why don't you like ghost trains? Are you scared of them?

Jeff: No, I’m not scared of them. They are too slow and the effects are awful. I would rather spend my time waiting in a queue for a big fast ride than go on a ghost train.

Polly: I once went into a horror house.

Jeff: What is a horror house?

Polly: It’s like a fun house, you walk around. But instead of moving stairs and ball pools there are people dressed up as characters from horror films.

Jeff: What do they do?

Polly: They jump out at you, they chase you. You will be walking down a dark corridor with eerie music playing and someone will touch your head or something will brush past your legs.

Jeff: That does sound scary. I hope that they have one of those at the amusement park!

 

COMPREHENSION QUIZZES (3 TO COMPLETE)

 

Interactive Video Comprehension Quiz 1

 

Summary Statements Comprehension Quiz 2

 

Drag and Drop Quiz 3: 

 

 

GRAMMAR PRACTICE: INTERROGATIVE FORMS

 

 

Interrogative pronouns


In the case of a person, is used the interrogative pronoun who. Let's take a look at building sentences using this form:

Object

Jeff               saw           Polly.

Subject        Verb        Object

If you want to ask who Jeff saw (we are asking about the object = Polly), the question becomes:

 

Example

Who did Jeff see?

Polly.

 

However, if we ask: Who saw Polly? (we ask for the subject = Jeff), the structure is:

Subject

Who + Verbo + Objeto... ?

 

Example:

Who saw Polly?

Jeff.

 

Interrogatives with prepositions


a) From indicates the origin.

 

Example:

I'm from Barcelona.

b) About indicates issues or topic.

 

Example:

We're talking about politics.

 

c) In indicates the place where the action develops.

 

Example:

She's in Madrid.

 

d) With indicates company.

 

Example:

They are with the children.

 

e) To indicate direction or destination.

 

Example:

She's talking to the audience.

 

f) The preposition is placed at the end of the sentence

 

Examples:

Who are you talking about?

Who are you talking to?

Where are you from?

Who are you playing with?

Who does the bag belong to?

 

Interrogative pronoun with things


When we talk about things, we use the interrogative pronoun What.

 

Examples:

What's the time?

What's your favourite colour?

 

The functions for what are the same as for who.

 

Object

 Jeff                 gave          a present.

Subject           Verb          Object

We could ask:

What did       Jeff             give?

Object          Subject         Verb

 

Subject

It is not very common for "what" to be the subject of a sentence. It usually occurs in phrases such as:

What happens?

What's happening?

 

What is it like?


What is + subject in 3rd person of the singular + like?

With what is it like? You will see that the construction of a phrase does not use like as a verb, but as a preposition:

 

Examples:

What's the new cinema like?

It's big.

What's Karen like?

She's very talented.

 

As you can see in the examples, this construction can be applied to both people and objects.

 

Examples:

What are Italian people like? 

They are very hospitable.

What are they like?

They are kind.

 

PRONUNCIATION PRACTICE

 

 

 

 

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