Lesson 90 – The Intern II – Enough and Too

LEVEL C1 - THE INTERN II

 


THERE IS AN OPTION FOR YOU TO TRANSLATE ALL THE TEXT

IN YOUR LANGUAGE (Top right > Select language > Click on the flags).


 

VOCABULARY

 

 

  • To keep him up to date
  • Far from encouraging
  • The pace of
  • The triviality of
  • Nothing as drastic as that
  • Delivering care
  • The day shift
  • To take its toll on him
  • A rush of
  • To pick up the pace
  • It is unfair
  • They have to carry him
  • I thought he would thrive
  • I was mistaken
  • A dead weight
  • He is grateful for that
  • I have no other choice
  • To dismiss him
  • To accommodate for
  • Short on staff
  • Thank you for letting me know
  • He hasn’t found his calling yet
  • His mentor
  • To put him forward
  • He wouldn’t flourish
  • His scores are excellent
  • Appears to be clued in
  • I’ll give him a months trial
  • Both parties are happy
  • To send him my way
  • It died down
  • He gets a bit rowdy
  • Patio
  • Crazy features
  • Living on bread and water
  • Nothing to write home about
  • To do a fun run
  • To help raise some money
  • Count me in
  • I’ll ask around
  • Who else is up for it
  • To sponsor me
  • I’ll put your name down
  • The sponsor forms
  • Disregarded
  • You can count on it

 

LESSON 90 DIALOGUE 

-Intern II-

 

 

Lesson 90 - The Intern II

John had received a telephone call from the manager of the free clinic where he had found a job for the intern. He had asked them to keep him up to date with the intern’s progress. The call, however, was far from encouraging.

Manager: I’m sorry John, I haven’t enough patience to deal with him any more. We are going to have to let him go...

John: I’m sorry to hear that. I felt that the pace of the clinic might help him concentrate more and the triviality of the injuries you handle would give him practice. Surely he isn’t putting anyone’s life at risk. Or is he?

Manager: Oh no, nothing as drastic as that. He’s certainly responsible enough when it comes to delivering care and distributing medication. It’s just that he isn’t working quickly enough. He’s been with us for four weeks now and the slow pace of the day shift seems to have taken its toll on him. When we have a rush of patients he is unable to pick up the pace. We have too few nurses and too many patients and it is unfair to the others that they have to carry him.

John: I’m surprised. I never imagined that this sort of work would be too hard for him. I thought he would thrive, but obviously I was mistaken. I can only apologise for sending you a dead weight.

Manager: I guess you weren’t to know. You gave him a second chance and I know he is grateful for that but I have no other choice but to dismiss him. I can give him to the end of the month to accommodate for the fact that we are short on staff but I’ll have to look for someone else.

John: I understand, thank you for letting me know. I don’t know if you are interested but I do know of someone who is looking for a job.

Manager: Not another failed intern, I hope.

John: Oh gosh, no! In fact this one sounds too good to be true. A young man who hasn’t even started his internship. He says that he wants to focus on a different sector of the industry, not hospitals. He just hasn’t found his calling yet. His mentor put him forward for the internship and he came highly recommended. I interviewed him but he was very honest and said that he felt he wouldn’t flourish in a hospital and he didn’t want to waste anyone’s time. His scores are excellent and he certainly appears to be clued-in (UK) / clued-up (USA).

Manager: Well, okay John. This sounds more like it. I’ll give him a month’s trial, see if both parties are happy.

John: Aw, that’s great. Thank you again. Hopefully this one won’t disappoint.

Manager: Yeah, I hope so too! Just send him my way and we’ll see how it goes. By the way, how is everything at the hospital?

John: Well… you know hospitals. Things have certainly died down after New Year’s but we have Saint Patrick’s Day coming up and that always gets a bit rowdy. I’ve never been into Guinness so I decided to work it. I’m kind of regretting it now.

Manager: They’re in good hands, John. And how is your lovely lady?

John: Sophie, oh, she’s great. She’s working on the plans for a patio with all sorts of crazy features. It’s going to cost us an arm and a leg but not too much that we are going to be living on bread and water for the rest of the year. How are things at the clinic?

Manager: The same! Drugs and drunks mostly but nothing to write home about. We’re going to do a fun run to help raise some money to help buy some equipment. We’re predicting the cuts will hit us again this year and we want to be prepared.

John: A fun run, you say! Well count me in, Sophie too! I’ll ask around and see who else is up for it. Those who aren’t can bloody well sponsor me.

Manager: Really? That’s fantastic! I’ll put your name down and email the sponsor forms to you. It’s going to be next month so not too long to practise. I need to get out there myself... I have somewhat disregarded my training since Christmas.

John: Turkey dinners and Baileys Irish Cream will do that to you! Send me those forms. I’ll start trying to get sponsors immediately.

Manager: I sure will. Please give my love to Sophie.

John: You can count on it. Speak to you soon. Bye!

Manager: Bye John!

COMPREHENSION QUIZZES (3 to complete)

Interactive Video Comprehension Quiz 1

 

Summary Statements Comprehension Quiz 2

 

Drag and Drop Quiz 3: 

GRAMMAR PRACTICE: ENOUGH AND TOO

 

ENOUGH TOO
Enough refers to a quantity that is needed or wanted.We use enough in the following situations:

  • ADJECTIVES/ADVERBS + ENOUGH

I can’t lift that huge stone.

I am not strong enough.

  • ENOUGH + NOUNS

No, I won’t buy that car.

I don’t have enough savings.
I don’t have enough patience to learn a language.

  • ENOUGH + 0

I don’t need more books for my research. I have enough.

  • ENOUGH…FOR SOMEBODY/SOMETHING

I think Lea is responsible enough for that job position.
That’s enough information for her. She doesn’t need to know more.

  • ENOUGH…TO DO SOMETHING

I am not strong enough to lift that huge stone.

Too refers to a bigger quantity that is needed.We use too in the following situations:

  • TOO + ADJECTIVES/ADVERBS

The soup is too salty.

You added a lot of salt.

  • TOO MUCH + UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS

We are using too much electricity.

  • TOO MANY + UNCOUNTABLE NOUNS

There are too many emails in my inbox.

I can’t reply to them all today.

  • TOO…FOR SOMEBODY/SOMETHING

That news was too surprising for me.
Maths is too hard for John.

  • TOO…TO DO SOMETHING

Armand is too good to be paid so little.

PRONUNCIATION PRACTICE

  • Related Pronunciation Video Lesson and interactive exercise(s):

 

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